‘Nursery’ firm created for young lawyers

Topics: Law firm & practice management,Junior lawyers

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A Manchester practice has created a separate firm to act as a nursery for young lawyers to learn the business.

Gunnerbloom, an offshoot of established firm gunnercooke, will be staffed by junior lawyers who will be given responsibility for generating leads and running the business.

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The firm will be based in the Manchester Escalator building, the city’s hub for entrepreneurs, with gunnercooke partner Sarah Goulbourne installed in compliance officer roles. The ‘parent’ firm has made it clear the subsidiary will not be expected to make any profit in its early years.

Gunnercooke runs as a ‘virtual’ firm, with practitioners operating on a franchise basis with access to the firm’s back office. All have at least 10,000 hours’ practising experience. Partners now say they want to find a way to bring through the next generation without changing a successful business model.

Anna Beaumont (pictured, centre), chief executive of gunnercooke, said: ‘We have always felt that junior lawyers would become better rounded advisers if their training focused more on the development of commercial and business skills.

‘We’re very excited about the prospect of building this model in gunnerbloom; creating the next generation of lawyers through tailored training and education.’

The first gunnerbloom lawyers, Ryan Brown and Sarah Bennett, will not specialise for the first three years of their training to ensure they develop wider commercial experience.

Readers' comments (4)

  • What is 10,000 hours practising experience? You can hardly measure this sensibly. Is it eight or ten years PQE? or is it quite literally a tally of the actual hours of work undertaken by each individual? or is it just nonsense?

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  • 'Anna Beaumont (pictured, centre), chief executive of gunnercooke, said: ‘We have always felt that junior lawyers would become better rounded advisers if their training focused more on the development of commercial and business skills.'

    Whilst I don't deny that the possession of commercial and business skills may aid the giving of good legal advice, I'm not sure I'd go as far as to say that junior lawyers' training should be more focused on this. After all, presumably their clients go to their legal advisers primarily for legal advice. Thus the focus of their training should be their legal skills. Or maybe Ms Beaumont has been slack in her use of the verb 'focus'?

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  • How about Articled Clerks instead?

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  • Hours of experience?
    Solicitor arrives at the Pearly Gates. As he's being booked in, he complains that there's been a mistake. He's only 38 but he's shown as being 95 on the manifest. The Clerk calls St. Peter, who duly arrives. He asks our man what he did for a living, and being told that he was a Solicitor, Peter explained that in the case of Solicitors they worked on hours charged out, not actual years lived.......

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